Travel Review: Must-See Places in Picturesque Paarl

image

In  early  October  of  2014,  I  had  my  first  real  acquaintance  with  the  beautiful,  picturesque  town  of Paarl,  apparently  the  third  oldest  town  and  former  European  settlement  in  South  Africa  (after  Cape Town and  Stellenbosch)  and the  largest  of the  Cape  Wineland  towns.

Translated  from  Afrikaans,  Paarl  means  ‘pearl’  and  though  its  name  is  drawn  from  its  well-known, unique  granite  rock  outcrops,  in  particular  three  rounded  outcrops  that  make  up  Paarl  Mountain (also  known  as  Pearl  Mountain  or  ‘Paarl  Rock’),  it  is  nevertheless  a  fitting  name  for,  with  its  beauty, magnificent  surrounding  mountains  and  natural  rock  formations  (the  second  largest  granite  outcrops in  the  world)  and  wonderful,  internationally-acclaimed  wine  estates  and  Cape  Dutch-style  buildings to  name  but  a  few  of  its  treasures,  Paarl  is  indeed  a  pearl  of  a  place  and  is  great  to  visit,  if  only  for  a day.

When  we  visited,  we  left  Cape  Town  bright  and  early  and  were  blessed  with  a  real  scorcher  of  a day,  despite  it  being  springtime.  It  was  amazing  what  we  managed  to  fit  into  one  glorious  day  visit and even  more  surprising when our day  ended  up being anything but  rushed.  🙂

Truthfully,  it’s  one  of  the  best  trips  I  have  stored  away  in  my  travel  memory  banks  and  I  have decided  it  is  time  to  share  some  of  my  personal  highlights  from  it  to  point  out  some  must-see  places for  visitors  to  check  out  in  pretty  Paarl.

Though  each  of  them  deserve  their  own  post,  I  hope  that, through  the  photos  I  have  amassed  from  our  trip  and  my  individual  place  summaries,  you  will  have enough to whet  your  travel  appetite!

First  up is  the  wonderful  Fairview  Wine  Estate.

image

To  get  there,  we  took  the  back  route,  near  Malmesbury  and,  although  we  were  afraid  we’d  wind  up lost  and  miss  our  lunchtime  booking,  we  made  it  with  time  to  spare  (though  it  took  a  little  longer than the  usual  50-60 min.  trip  from  C.T. :P) and  relative  navigational  ease.

Fairview  is  really  well-named  and  is  one  of  the  more  beautiful  farms  I  have  ever  had  the  pleasure  of visiting.

With  it’s  bright  orange,  crane  flowers  (otherwise  known  as  strelitzia)  to  one  side  of  the smooth  brick-paved  drive  and  a  spacious  parking  area  to  the  other,  and  famous  Goat  Tower  and gardens  before  you,  you’re  likely  to  be  charmed  by  the  estate  from  the  moment  you  enter  into  its confines.image

The  walled,  fairytalesque  Goat  Tower  (built  in  1981),  where  its  equally  famous  bearded  inhabitants reside  in  lieu  of  a  princess,  is  one  of  the  main  highlights  and  is  sure  to  delight  both  children  and adults  alike.  Plus,  it  must  be  lovely  to  watch  the  goats  going  up  and  down  their  winding  wooden staircase  from  the  shelter  of  The  Goatshed…  they  were  smart  enough  to  mainly  stay  in  inside  when we visited. image

This  third-generation  wine  and  goat  farm  owned  by  the  Back  family,  who  first  introduced  the  goats to  Fairview  in  1980,  is  home  to  some  1000  does  (female  goats)  who  alternatively  reside  in  grassy pastures  and  their  huge,  sprinkler-equipped  sheds  (to  combat  Paarl’s  devilishly  hot  summer  climate) and provide  the  milk for the  estate’s  Vineyard Cheesery.

I  can  personally  attest  to  the  excellence  and  variety  of  Fairview’s  award-winning,  beautifully packaged  cheeses,  which  can  easily  be  found  in  most  leading  shopping  markets.  Their  flagship Roydon  Camembert  has  won  five  gold  World  Cheese  Award  medals  and  the  first  goats’  milk  cheese-  in  their  Chevin  with  Garlic  &  Herbs  –  to  win  ‘Product  of  the  Year’  at  the  S.A.  National  Dairy Championships.

As  for  The  Goatshed  and  the  estate’s  magnificent  grounds  (which  are  complete  with  a  fancy  fish pond,  rolling  lawns,  bed  upon  bed  of  flowers,  a  crocodile  dam  and  delightful  pathways  through  the trees  and  herb  gardens.  You  can  even  see  some  quirky,  rusty  farm  implements  outside  its  Tasting Room  and  Shop  &  Deli),  there’s  so  much  to  see  and  enjoy  and  the  old-fashioned,  relaxed  country atmosphere  is  sure  to delighted.

image

image

(A  word  of  caution:  prior  booking  is  essential  if  you  plan  on  enjoying  Fairview’s  The  Goatshed Restaurant.  On weekends,  especially  Sundays  as  we  found out, the  place  is  packed  and rightly  so!)

Although  there’s  much  to  enjoy  at  The  Goatshed  (open  7  days  a  week  from  09:00-17:00), which  is slickly  well-run  and  has  an  amazing,  easy-going  family  atmosphere,  whether  you  sit  indoors,  out  on their  veranda  or  at  one  of  the  tables  beneath  the  lovely  vineyard  pergola,  and  the  most  wonderful views  of the  farm’s  main grounds  and above  all, the  Goat  Tower.

image

image

We  were  fortunate  to  have  a  perfectly  positioned  table  nearest  the  Tower  where  we  enjoyed  a  most tasty  selection  of  their  famous  produce  when  we  ordered  cheese  and  bread  platters,  which  included some  of  their  tastiest  freshly  baked  breads,  an  assortment  of  top  Jersey  cow-  and  goat-milk  cheese (with  some  of  my  favourites  having  sweet  chilli,  fig,  black  pepper  and  even  cranberry  inside  them), paired  with  a  glass  of  rich,  ruby  red  Fairview  wine  –  and  honestly,  the  entire  Goatshed  restaurant experience  gets  a  10/10 restaurant rating from me.
<image

image

Virtually  everything  from  the  herbs  used  in  the  Goatshed’s  dishes  to  the  famous  wine  and  cheeses, with  their  iconic  goat-inclusive  label,  is  produced  locally  on  the  farm  (or  sourced  from  other  local farms) as  Fairview  strive  to be  ultra  eco-friendly  in its  farming  methods.

It  is  open  daily,  from  09:00-17:00 (except  on  Good  Friday  and  over  the  entire  Easter  Weekend,  I think)  and  can be  found at  Suid-Agter Paarl,  Suider-Paarl.

Fairview  is  one  of  the  Cape’s  finest  offerings  and  comes  highly  recommended  with  a  firm  10/10 overall  rating! I loved  every  single  minute  spent  there  – and  if you  visit,  I’m  sure  you  will  too. 🙂

For   more   info.,   please   contact   Fairview   on   +27   (021)   863   2450  or   email   them   at: info@fairview.co.za.

(For   The  Goatshed  bookings  and  enquiries,  please  see   their  website: http://www.goatshed.co.za, email  them  at:  goatshed@fairview.co.za or call  them  on:  +27  (021) 863 3609.

Many  thanks  to  the  excellent  Fairview  Wine  Estate  and  their  smart  www.fairview.co.za for the  wonderful  experience  and additional  info.  used  in this  write-up.

After  that,  we  drove  a  short  distance  along  the  backroads  of  Paarl  as  we  headed  to  one  of  South Africa’s  oldest  and  most  internationally-renowned  wine  estates,  Nederburg  Wine  Estate,  which ,with  its  excellent  wines  and  time-honoured  wine-making  methods,  has  won  more  wine  awards  than any  other  estate  in South  Africa.

image

According  to  http://showme.co.za,    Nederburg  was  established  in  1791  by  German  settler,  Phillipus Wolvaart  and  changed  hands  quite  a  few  times  before  it  was  significantly  purchased  in  1937  by Johan  Graue,  whose  “forward  thinking  approach  and  new  techniques  established  Nederburg  as  the leading  producer  of  quality  wines  in  South  Africa.”

Furthermore,  winemaker  Gunther  Brozel  is  the only  S.A.  winemaker  to  have  won  the  ‘International  Wine  and  Spirits  Competition  Winemaker  of the  Year’  award.

The  estate,  with  its  wonderful  plethora  of  Cape  Dutch  buildings,  lovely  circular  rose  garden, expansive  grounds,  ancient  oak  trees  and perfectly  manicured  grass lawns and  lime-green  vineyards in  front  of  its  Visitors  Centre,  is  afforded  truly  gorgeous  views  of  the  imposing  Drakenstein mountains  and  the  sights  from  the  magnificent,  Cape  Dutch-style  thatched  Manor  House  (finished in  1800  and  recognised  as  a  National  Monument  in  the  late  90s)  –  and  the  bistro-style  Red  Table Restaurant that  now  has  its  culinary  home  there  –  are  quite  breathtaking  and  make  for  a  truly memorable  visit  and photograph or two.

image

image

image

(Another annual  draw  card is  Nederburg’s  New  Year’s  Eve  fine  classical  music  celebration.)

Again,  we  had  booked  in  advance  and,  after  taking  some  great  photos  of  the  grounds  and  the timeless,  beautifully  maintained  (both  inside  and  out)  Manor  House,  we  sat  in  dappled  sunshine  at our  decidedly  red-themed  table  and  chairs  on  the  lovely  terrace.  Children  seem  to  really  delight  in the  giant  Jenga, croquet, skittles  and swings  on-site.

Because  it  was  a  stiflingly  hot  early  afternoon  by  this  time  and  we  were  still  suitably  stuffed  from our Fairview  lunch,  we  ‘cheated’  a  bit  and  just  ordered  some  chilled  white  wine  and  cordials,  which we  enjoyed  with  our  complimentary  pita  bread  and  basil  pesto  dip,  before  two  out  of  three  of  our trio,  myself  included,  ordered  some  mouth-watering  and  fast-melting  Sinnful  ice-cream.  (Desserts are  about  R35, whilst wine  by  the  glass  or  by the  bottle  varies  in  price.)

image

The  Red  Table  Restaurant’s  Andrea  Foulkes  and  her  staff’s  service  was  good  and  as  such,  I  award it  a  8/10  rating. To  contact  them  for  bookings  or  enquiries,  please  call  +27  (021)  877  5155  or  email them  at:  theredtable.co.za

As  for  the  magnificent  Nederburg  Wine  Estate  itself,  which  also  has  an  Old  Cellar  Museum  for visitors  to  explore,  I  truly  adored  its  old-world  charm  and  beauty  and  award  it  a  10/10  overall rating  too.

image

image

image

It  is  open  Monday  to  Friday  from  08:00  to  17:00  and  on  Saturdays  from  10:00-16:00  during November  to  March.  From  April  to  October,  on  Saturdays,  it’s  open  from  10:00-14:00  and from  11:00-16:00  on  Sundays  (during  Nov.-March)  and  is  open  on  all  public  holidays,  except Good  Friday  and  Christmas  Day.

For  more  info.  and  the  available  tours,  please  contact  them  on   +27  (021)  862  3104   or  see http://www.nederburg.com (you  must  be  18  years  or  old  to  access  their  website  and  social  media)  or  find them at: Sonstraal Road, Dal Josafat, Paarl.

After  that,  we  drove  from  the  outskirts  of  town  back  into  town  and  headed  along  Paarl  Main  Road before  we  found  a  pretty,  scenic  dirt  back  road  (it’s  not  too  bad  as  ‘farm  roads’  go…),  which  I  later discovered  is  in  fact  the  rather  famous  Jan  Philips  Mountain  Drive  (opened  in  1928  and  built  by famous  wagon  builder,  Jan  Philips  in  partnership  with  the  municipality)  and  which,  according  to http://www.fodors.com ,   is  halfway  down  the  road  from  the  Afrikaans  Language/Taal  Monument  and which  leads  up  to  Paarl  Mountain  that  was  declared  a  National  Monument  in  1963  and  offers wonderful  places  to  visit  such  as:  the  Paarl  Nature  Reserve  and    Meulwater  (Mill  Water)  Flower Garden.

Along  the  way,  we  passed  one  of  three  reservoirs  and  turned  right  at  the  fork  in  the  road  there,  after which  time,  we  reached  the  top  and  stopped  just  before  the  Reserve’s  entrance  to  take  photos  –  and wow,  were  the  views  of  the  picturesque  Berg  River  valley,  encircled  by  majestic  mountains,  from up there  something  to behold!

image

image

image

image

After  that,  we  entered  the  Reserve  (entry  fee:  R45  per  vehicle  and  R15  per  occupant;  open during  summer  (1st  October-31st March)  from  07:00-19:00 and  from  07:00-18:00 during winter (1st  April-30th  September)  and  on  all  public  holidays) and  enjoyed  exploring  the  beautiful Meulwater  Flower  Garden  and braai-picnic  site.

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

There, you  can  see  fifteen varieties  of protea  flower (look out  for the  informative  little  garden cabin that  gives  samples  and info. on many  of the  flowers) and birds  such as  the  sugar- and sun-birds. With  the  unique  granite  boulders  that  edge  the  pretty  (especially  near  sunset  when  we  visited), flowing  water  and  interesting  garden  paths  that  wind  through  the  fragrant,  beautiful  natural shrubbery  and  flowers,  I  felt  a  bit  like  Alice  In  Wonderland  as  there  really  is  a  kind  of  magical feeling  about  the  place  that  gently  breathes  beauty,    tranquillity  and  above  all,  a  prevailing  sense  of calm.  🙂

image

image

image

Due  to  its  beauty  and  safe,  family  feeling  (it  was  pretty  crowded  when  we  visited  but  still  we  were able  to  find  our  own  private  spots  and  I  was  fortunate  to  have  a  close  encounter  with  a  lovely  and surprisingly  tame  sun-bird  as  it  drank  the  ‘nectar’of  a  protea)  on  that  particular  late  afternoon,  I would  give  it  a  10/10  overall  rating.

For more  info.  on the  Paarl  Nature  Mountain  Reserve  or the  Meulwater  Flower  Garden,  please  visit: http://www.paarlonline.com  or contact  Louise  de  Roubaix on:  +27  (082) 744 5900.

Many   thanks   to   the   following   sites   for   the   additional   info.   used   in   this   write-up: www.paarlonline.com, www.sa-venues.com, www.sleeping-out.co.za, http://m.wikipedia.org, www.fodors.com and Deon Naude  of Lemoenkloof  Guesthouse  via  Catherine  Sempill.

After  that,  we  quickly  nipped  down  the  road  and  (I  think  the  road  connects  with  Gabbema  Doordrift Drive  after  a  short  distance  but  not  dead  certain)  on  to  the   Afrikaans  Language  Monument, otherwise  known as  the  ‘Taal  Monument’.
image

According  to  www.paarlonline.com ,  the  Taal  Monument  was  built  in  1975  by  Jan  van  Wijk  and “acknowledges  the  influence  of  a  variety  of  languages  such  as  Dutch,  Malay,  Malay-Portuguese, Arabic,   French,   German,  English  and  the  indigenous  Khoi  and  African  languages,  on  the development  of  Afrikaans.”

You  can  visit  it  with  a  tour  group  (though the  20-minute-long  guided  tours  are  free  and  available daily  between  8:00  and  11:30  or  14:30  and  16:45,  they  are  available  upon  request  via  pre-booking only)  as  our  fellow  tourists  did  when  we  rather  luckily  entered  in  the  final  half  an  hour  before closing  (and  thus,  the  last  permitted  entrance  time)  but  it’s  good  fun  to  enjoy  with  friends  and  loved ones.

Within  you  will  find  an  “exotic  garden”,  rolling  green  lawns,  the  Volksmond  Coffee  Shop  (there  are also  picnic  baskets  available  for  purchase;  full  moon  picnics  and  stargazing  evenings  are  popular events  here),  telescopes  and  raised  wooden  decks  for  viewing,  as  well  as  the  main  monument  itself and its  two amphitheatres.

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

With  its  unusual  water  features,  flute-like  shapes  and  giddying  height  and  size,  the  proud,  swirling monument  is  a  wonderful  and truly  interesting  structure  to explore.

I  don’t  really  like  man-made  heights  so  I’m  not  sure  I’d  climb  it  quite  as  adventurously  as  I’ve  seen other people  do on social  media  but  I didn’t  mind taking the  steps  up. 🙂

I  particularly  liked  the  inside,  which,  right  up  to  the  top  of  its  chimney-like  opening,  offers  a  pretty lighting pattern, especially  as  the  day  draws  to  a  close.

As  we  discovered  on  the  day,  as  a  couple  was  having  a  photo  shoot  near  the  steps,  the  venue  is excellent  for all  kinds  of private  and commercial  photo  shoots  alike.

The  Taal  Monument  was  an  unexpectedly  beautiful  place  and  although  it  was  last  on  our  list,  it  was certainly  worthwhile  and  it  gave  us  the  most  breathtaking  views  of  Paarl  and  indeed,  my  beloved Mother City  away  in the  distance.

It  is  well  worth  a  visit  and sometime  I’d like  to go back  and check out  the  Taal  museum  and the  little  coffee  shop, which was  sadly  closed when we  visited. With  the  slanting  sun’s  golden  rays  and  the  breathtaking  views  witnessed  through  and  around  the sturdy  structures,  our  visit  was  certainly  golden  and  as  first-time  visitors,  we  were  blessed  with  the best.

I  do  need  to  explore  the  Monument  and  its  attractions  more  fully  in  the  future  as  I  mentioned  before but, based on what  I saw, it  easily  deserves  a  10/10  overall  rating.

The  Taal  Monument  is  open  Monday  to  Sunday  from  08:00-17:00  (April  to  Nov.)  and  from 08:00-20:00 during  summer  (Dec.  to March). (It is  closed  on  Christmas  and  New  Year’s  Day.)

The  entrance  fee  (as  of  April  2015  to  March  2017)  is  R25  per  adult  (this  fee  includes  both museum  and  monument),  whereas  for  S.A.  students  (with  valid  student  cards)  it’s  R10  and  R5 for  children  6  years  and  old  (kids  under  six  get  in  free)  and  for  pre-booked  school  groups  pay R2 per  learner.

For  more  info.,  please  call:  +27  (021)  863  4809/0543,  email  them  at:  admin@taalmuseum.co.za visit  the  website:  www.taalmuseum.co.za.

Many  thanks  to  www.paarlonline.com and  www.taalmseum.co.za or for  the  additional  info.  used  in this  write-up.

Thus,  our  wonderful  visit  to  the  beautiful  Paarl  Valley  drew  to  a  fitting  close  as  the  sun  began  to  set and  we  enjoyed  a  quiet  evening  drive  back  to  Cape  Town…  There  are  so  many  sights  and  places  to take  in when you  visit  Paarl  but  these  are  surely  some  of the  best!  🙂

Many  thanks  to  my  amazing  2014  travel  companions  and  loved  ones,  Ash  and  Lies,  for  the additional  photos  used  in  this  post. For  more  great  photos  and  wonderful  blog  posts  from  places  the world-over, you  can  also check  out  Lies’s  excellent  travel  blog at:  www.nonstopdestination.com.

Posted from WordPress for Android by T.A.Ryan

Author: Tamlyn Amber Ryan

Tamlyn Ryan is a writer and blogger, who runs her own travel blog, called Tamlyn Amber Wanderlust. Despite a national diploma in Journalism, her preferred niche remains travel writing. She is a hopeless wanderer, equipped with an endless passion for road trips, carefully planned, holiday itineraries and above all else, the great outdoors.

Let me know your thoughts or suggestions! I'd love to hear from you.