Back Down to the ‘Bowl’: Platteklip Gorge Hike – Part 2

Continuing  from  where  I  left  off  in  the  first  installment  of  my  Platteklip  Gorge  Hike  (to read  Part  1,  please  see my site),  I  was  unexpectedly  refreshed  and  content  once  I  finally  reached the  top of the  Table. As  soon  as  I  emerged  into  the  open  (if  you’ve  hiked  the  Gorge  or  Indian  Venster  trails),  I found  visitors  zigzagging  along  the  mountain’s  vast  expanses,  enjoying  some  of  the  more immediate  of  Table  Mountain  National  Park’s  (TMNP)  many  walks.  These  include: Agama-,  Klipspringer-  and  Dassie-Walk,  which  apparently  take  between  15-45  minutes to  cover.

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

(Speaking  of  Indian  Venster,  I  found  out  where  the  latter  comes  out  ‘Table  top-side’  –  it’s just  past  the  start  of  Platties  –  but  closer  inspection  of  the  sign  warned  me  against  trying the  route  as  a  return  trip  as   the  recommended route for  going  back down Table Mountain remains Platteklip.)

image

(Note:  Some  people  catch  the  cable  car  down  but  be  certain  of  the  weather,  as  the cableway  is  closed  during  strong  winds  and  bad  weather  some  60-90  days  per  year  and you  don’t  want  to  get  stranded  atop Table  Mountain  if  the  weather  changes.)

There  are  charming  wooden  walkways  through  the  beautiful fynbos  (there  are  some 1,460  different  species)  and  indigenous  plants  and  flowers  and  informative  plaques,  maps and  memorials,  though  my  favourite  discovery  remains  the  ’round  table’,  which  offers mini  versions  of  the  Cape  Peninsula  and  Mother  City’s  surrounds,  set  amidst  a  sea  of aqua  green  water  and  encircled  by  indigenous  plants  and  flowers,  with  its  outer  ring depicting  the  distances  from  here  to the  world’s  other  major  cities.

It  takes  about  10-15  minutes  to  get  from  the  outer  expanse  to  the  Shop  at  the  Top  (where you  can  purchase  return  tickets  for  the  cable car)  and  the  other  excellent  facilities  such  as the  Table  Mountain  Cafe  (“open  for  breakfast,  lunch  &  refreshments”),  clean  toilets, Terrace/Bar  and  the  odd  pop-up  stall  selling  snacks  and  drinks. 

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

There  is  ample  seating, both  indoors  and  outdoors,  but  you’re  also  not  short  on  beautiful  stone  walls,  numerous, huge  mottled  boulders  and  wooden  benches,  which  most  visitors  park  down  on, especially  as  you  get  to  admire  the  all-round  breathtaking  views  of  the  city  spread  out  all those  thousands  of  metres  below  you  on  one  side  and  on  the  other,  you  have  the  most amazing  views  of  the  seemingly  endless  coastline    that  stretches  off  into  the  wispy  pale blue  horizon – in fact, Table  Mountain  National  Park stretches  as  far as  Cape  Point.
image

image

image

image

image

image

I  really  loved  taking  my  time  strolling  over  to  the  main  section  near  the  facilities  and upper  cable car  station  itself  (it’s  pretty  cool  to  see  the  sturdy-looking  cables  that  make  the whole  experience  possible  up  close)  and  kept  stopping  at  various  look-out  spots  to  take photos.  There  are  also  telescopes  (R5 per viewing)  that  aid  your  vision.  Keep  an  eye  out  for natural  and  man-made  landmarks  alike  such  as  the  Cape  Town  Stadium and harbour,  Robben Island  and of course, the  proud Signal  Hill.
image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

On my way towards to Upper Station, I overheard  a  family  eagerly  discussing  were  the  unusual  little  rock formations  that  appear  to  be  stacked  there  in  places.  I’m  not  sure  if  it’s  part  of  some intiation  ritual  or  if  it’s  merely  something  hikers  have  taken  to  doing,  as  it  looks  quite interesting,  but  I told  them  that  I’d seen a  similar  sight  at  Lion’s  Head.
image

After   that,   I  sighted  my  first  dassies. I  only  saw  about  three,  which  was  a  bit disappointing  but  I  do  imagine  it’s  dependent  on  the  time  of  day.  Usually  they  like  to come  out  in  the  early  morning  or  late  afternoon  when  the  rocks  are  warm  but  not  too hot…  I  guess  the  rocks  were  hotting  up  and  getting  a  bit  too  roasty  for  these  cool,  little dudes  when  I  visited.

Table  Mountain  is  famous  for  them  and  you  can  often  get  quite close  to  them  –  they’re  a  big  hit  with  everyone  who  visits  as  proved  to  be  the  case  that day  too,  as  people  eagerly  pointed  them  out  to  each  other  or  stood  smilingly  watching them  frolic  about  on the  rocks  for unnaturally  long periods  of time.
image

image

Personally, I feel like I  was  more  awestruck  by  the  fact  that  I  was  back  on  top  of  Table  Mountain  some fourteen  years  after  I  first  visited  it  as  a  child  with  my  parents  and  older  brothers.  It  was strange  to  be  walking  around  there  on  my  own,  recalling  the  times  we  had  spent  up  there. I  grew  quite  nostaglic  for  my  childhood…  everything  just  seemed  so  much  easier  when I was seven years  old.

At  the  same  time,  it  was  rather  special  and  felt  like  quite  an  amazing  and  rewarding personal  accomplishment.  My  tired  legs  and  fleeting  nausea  were  quickly  banished  from memory  as  I,  like  many  of  the  other  hikers,  felt  miraculously  rejuvenated  once  I  safely and  victoriously reached  the  top.
image

image

I  did  see  many  of  my  fellow  hiking  friends  from  the  day  up  there  too  – my  Aussie companions  had  made  it  up  in  one collective piece  and  sat  a  few  tables  away  from  me  inside  the Cafe  and  on  my  way  back  from  Dassie  Walk,  I  passed  the  lady  who  had  been  struggling up  Platteklip  in  my  wake.  She  happily  exclaimed,  “You  made  it!”  and  we  both  laughed with relief.  I was  also  able  to  help  by  taking  a  few  photos  of  her  (many  people  use  selfie  sticks these  days  but  don’t  feel  shy  to  ask  someone  to  take  a  proper  photo  for  you,  whether  you are  in  a  group  or  on  your  own  like  I  was.  Later,  another  group  of  young  Germans  asked me  to  take  several  snaps  for  them  and  I  was happy  to  oblige).  She  asked  me where  I  was  from  (“Natal  originally…  it’s  another  province  of  South  Africa,”)  and  I  learnt she  was  from  Munich.  She  told  me  I  should  visit  someday  and  I  promised  her  it’s definitely one  of the  places  on my travel  bucket  list.  🙂

Though I  love  the  general  goodwill  and  politeness  that  visiting  such  a  stunning  place  reveals  to one  – and  it’s  always  so  interesting  for  me  to  interact  with  foreigners  and  locals  alike, there was  also  an  impromptu  choir  group  exploring  the  mountain  – I  got  a  bit desperate  after  a  while  and  I  looked  like  I  wasn’t  the  only  one  who  wished  they  might stop singing eventually…  It’s  not  that  they  weren’t  good,  it’s  just,  you  kind  of  want  to experience  the  beauty and  sounds  of the  mountaintop  without  that  human kind of distraction.

After  exploring  the  areas  just  past  the  Upper  Station  and  pausing  to  read  a  few  of  the signs  and  memorials  (some  are  dedicated  to  hikers  who  have  tragically  perished  on  the various  routes)  and  visiting  the  bathroom  (which  you  can  expect  to  be  pretty  full  but  I didn’t  have  to  wait  long  and  although  it  wasn’t  as  spick  and  span  as  the  Lower  Station one,  it  was  still  decidedly  clean  for  a  busy  public  toilet),  I  disappeared  into  the  cool depths  of the  Shop at  the  Top.
image

image

image

image

image

image

image

It’s  fun  to  walk browse, they  have:  caps,  t-shirts,  artwork  and  all  kinds  of  imaginable keepsakes and goodies  (including  animal  ‘droppings’,  like  the  dassie  ones,  which  are really  chocolate  treats…  :P).  It’s  not  necessarily  cheap  but  they  mainly  cater  for  tourists and  I  would  still  have  glad  bought  something  if  I  had  had  cash  to  spare. 
image

Also,  the outer  windows  overlook  the  main  look-out  points  and  picnic benches  so  be  sure  to  peer through  them  when inside. 
image

image

image

There  weren’t  too  many  people  in  the  shop  when  I visited  but  outside,  this  area  was teeming  with  people.  I  gave  up  standing trying  to  take photos  after  a  while  because  I had to keep  moving  out  of people’s  shots.
image

image

There  are  more VISA umbrellas  scattered  about  to  provide  some  much needed  shade.  As  mentioned  in  my  last  post,  the  temperature  is  often  about  5  degrees  cooler on  top  of  the  Table  Mountain  so  it’s  advisable  to  pack  in  a  light  top/ jacket  but honestly,  I was  immensely  grateful  for  the  slightly  cool breeze  on  the  top.  It  was deliciously  refreshing  and  kept  me  from  getting  too  hot.  I  actually  had  to  re-apply  my sunscreen – something  else  (along with  a  sun hat  of some sort) you  will  need up top.
image

The  Table  Mountain  Cafe was my next port of call… It  is  smart  and  efficiently  run by its staff  and  has  more  than  enough  tables and seating, both  inside and out,  and  I  plan  to  go  back  sometime  to  review  it  separately  as I  really  enjoyed  my  time  in  there  and  can’t  wait  to  try  the  reasonably  priced  buffet and  other  large  self-service  food  (their  plates  are  biodegradable)  and  drink  options available. 

It  was  admittedly  very  full  but  I  managed  to  check  out  everything  available  on offer  and  pay  for  my  purchase  quite  timeously  without  bumping  into  anyone.  The  food and  drinks  are  great  and  you  have  quite  a  selection  to  choose  from  but  I  was  a  bit  wary about  eating  too  much  so  I  compromised  by  buying  a  wonderfully  chilled  and  tasty Sinnful  watermelon  ice  lolly  (R16.50),  which  I  enjoyed  as  a  sit  down  (though  there  are take-away  options  too) at  my own table… Yes, I did indeed get pretty lucky.

I really  loved the  Cafe  inside  and  will  definitely  be  going  back  to  enjoy  it  more  fully  in  the not-too-distant  future.

Something  else  I’d  love  to  check  out  next  time  are  the  free guided tours that  apparently take place on the hour, from 9h00-15h00.

I  must make special mention  of the fact that I  absolutely  adore  how  everything  has  been  kept  as  natural  and eco-friendly  as  possible.  In  fact,  in  the  bathroom stalls,  you  can  read  about  the  various measures  taken  to  ensure  that  Table  Mountain  Aerial  Cableway  is  kept  as  sustainable  and green  as  possible.image

image

image

image

image

 
For  instance,  according  to  http://skinnylaminx.com ,  “1.5  litres  of  fresh water  per  visitor  are  used  at  the  Upper  Station.  This  includes  all  cleaning  and  all  use  of water  in  the  cafe  and  toilets.  Grey  water  is  pumped  by  the  night-shift  team  into  a  separate tank  and  is  then  attached  to  the  bottom  of  the  cable  car  and  taken  down  at  night.  The  loos at  the  Upper  Station  recycle  water  from  the  hand  basins  for  flushing  and  they  boast beautiful  fynbos-inspired  wall  murals  by  local  designer,  Heather  Moore.”

Futhermore,  all  supplies,  fresh  water  and  materials  travel  up  in  the  cablecars,  as  does  all sewage,  rubbish  and  recycables  that  need  to  come  down.  In  2013,  38  tons  of  waste  was recyled  and  43 tons  in  2012!

What’s  more,  all  the  buildings, railings and walkways  on  top  of  Table  Mountain  have  been  built  out  of  stone or  wood  and  nestle  amidst  the  natural  stone  pavings,  boulders  and  fynbos  as  if  they  have always co-existed there together, even  the  tiles  blend  in  quite naturally.  My  personal  favourite  has  to  be  the  fairtytale-esque  old  stone  building,  which is  really too  adorable  and quaint  for words  (this  is  where  the  Shop @ the Top is found.

the  image

image

image

I  arrived  on  Table  Mountain  at  12:30  p.m.  and  stayed  there  until  around  14:15. After  I  refilled  my  water  bottle  (there  are  free  water  foundations  on  top  of  the  Mountain)  and gave  the  dassies  (also keep  an  eye  out  for  the  tame  glossy starlings,  who  frequent  the  rocks and stone walls near  the  toilets  but  please do not feed the dassies or birds)  one parting  wistful  glance,  I  hurried back  down  Platteklip  as  I  had  to  be  home  in  time  for  the Springboks’s semi-final  World Cup match  at  16:00 p.m.

The descent goes far quicker  coming  down  and  I  felt  like  a klipspringer myself  as  I  hurried down (encouraging hikers this time) through the  far shadier  gorge’s  clutches (it was definitely a cooler, much  quieter  time  to  hike). 

I’m  sorry  to  say  my  faithful  makeshift  hiking  shoes  had  to  be chucked when I got home  but  this  wasn’t  the  route’s  fault, it  was still a  bit  hard  on  the  ankles  so  after  a  while,  even though I  gave  up  jumping  from  step  to  step, I still  managed  to reach the  bottom  by  about  15:30  p.m. 

Many people  branched  off  at  the  river  and  took  another  route  down  by  I  decided  to  stick  with the  one  I  knew  and  headed  back  the  same  way as I had  come  –  after  that,  I only passed one man  but  I  honestly  didn’t  mind  the  solitude  and  quietness,  with  only  the  occasional birdcall  for  company.  However,  I  am  used  to  being outdoors  on my  own and perhaps for others, this would be more disquieting than soothing.

After  that,  I  quickly  hurried  back  to  my  flat on foot, having missed  the  MyCiti  bus  (you  can  catch  the shuttle  bus  from  Lower  Tafelberg  Road’s  Kloof  Nek  bus  stop  to  the  Lower  Station free  of  charge,  either  way  and  you  don’t  need  to  worry  about  not  having  a  MyCiti card  as  Table  Mountain  Cableway  kindly  sponsors  this)  I  had  wanted  to  catch  so  I really  didn’t  have  much  choice  to  head  back  through  Tamboerskloof,  Kloof  and  then Gardens  before  I  was  back  in  the  Bowl just in time for the rugby, feeling faintly  tired  and  more  than  a  little  sunburnt  on  my legs  (whoops)  but  throughly  pleased  with  my  wonderful  day  out!

I  had  a  really tremendous  day  on  top  of  the  Table  and  really  recommend  it  that  everyone finds  a  way  to  visit  Table  Mountain  –  whether  you  catch  the  cableway  or  hike  up  one  of its  great  hiking  trails.

It’s  a  truly  unforgettable  and  amazing  experience and Table Mountain  thoroughly deserves  to  be  an official  new  7th wonder  of nature, for it  is  most  certainly that!  🙂

Many  thanks  to  Table  Mountain  Aerial  Cableway, and Cafe  and skinny laminx for  the  additional  information  used  in  this  post  and  to everyone responsible for  ensuring that  visitors  have  a  wonderful  and  enjoyable  experience  visiting  our  city’s  most spectacular  Table  Mountain.

All in all, my  Platteklip  Gorge  hike  and  Table  Mountain  experience  both  get  a   serious  10/10 rating.

For  more  info.,  please  contact   Table  Mountain  Aerial  Cableway  on:  +27  (021) 4875721  or  +27  (021)  424  8181,  email  them  at: info@tablemountain.net,  visit  their website: http://www.tablemountain.net or find  them  on social  media.
(Note:  Cableway  tickets  can  be  purchased  online).

Additionally,  for  more  information  on  the  Table  Mountain  National  Park,  please  see: http://tmnp.co.za.

image

572 total views, 3 views today

966total visits,1visits today

1 thought on “Back Down to the ‘Bowl’: Platteklip Gorge Hike – Part 2”

Let me know your thoughts or suggestions! I'd love to hear from you.